Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Be Careful Who You Quote

UPDATES BELOW

This really only applies to the few that have blogs but it appears that the AP is trying to re-write current fair use policies in regards to their content. Using tactics that are being compared to the RIAA's going after grandma for downloading a Neil Diamond MP3, the AP sent DCMA take down notices to several blogs for what they termed copyright violations.
I'm currently engaged in a legal disagreement with the Associated Press, which claims that Drudge Retort users linking to its stories are violating its copyright and committing "'hot news' misappropriation under New York state law." An AP attorney filed six Digital Millenium Copyright Act takedown requests this week demanding the removal of blog entries and another for a user comment.

The AP got their panties in a bunch over the very common and currently legal practice in the blogosphere of providing an excerpt to some other content along with providing a link to the site in which the whole article from where the quote was taken originally appeared. This practice is normally considered good for both parties, the blogger provides a quote from another source to which he can expand upon and the original author gets an increase in exposure as well as a bump in traffic from the link provided. The AP disagrees and is now embroiled in a blogger backlash that they probably didn't expect.

F U AP

A Proposal to the Associated Press: A Link Ethic

Here's Our New Policy On A.P. stories: They're Banned

Does the old adage that "all press is good press" hold true when you are a part of the old dying media and the "press" aimed at you is all bad and coming from the new and growing media?

UPDATE: And if this does in fact change they way blogs do things, will not being able to quote other sources without prior (re: paid) permission doom one of our local bloggers whose endless quotes from WorldNetDaily and Rush Limbaugh make up a majority of his posts? Just wondering...

UPDATE 2: We all know that greed is behind this new AP policy, I briefly touched on it in the update above, but now it is official. The AP showed it's hand and is now requiring that bloggers quoting their articles must pay $2.50 a word. I have a feeling I know where this is headed and judges and lawyers will likely be involved and Kos already has his wallet ready.

UPDATE 3: Here is the AP form that they want those citing AP content to fill out.

Pricing:























5-25$ 12.50
26-50$ 17.50
51-100$ 25.00
101-250$ 50.00
251 and up$ 100.0


Ok so I just quoted 10 items from the AP, I suppose I will be getting a bill for $12.50

No comments:

Post a Comment

Anonymous comments are allowed as long a you pick a pseudonym and stick with it. Posting under multiple names is not permitted and will result in all comments being deleted.

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.