Monday, September 4, 2006

Rounds' Excuses Are Starting To Show Some Holes

An AP article in this morning's Aberdeen News looks at several other states and their execution laws and it turns out that South Dakota isn't alone when it comes to their 2 drug procedure when performing executions.

Unlike here though, states like Oklahoma which by coincidence executed their 83rd inmate since 1990 on the same date that Governor Rounds stopped Elijah Page's execution, use a 3 drug cocktail even though their law calls for 2.
"No one's raised that issue here," Oklahoma Department of Corrections spokesman Jerry Massie told the Rapid City Journal.

Even Attorney General Larry Long is quoted as saying that the 2 drug law didn't apply because Page have waived all his rights. So what was Governor Rounds excuse again? Because it being illegal doesn't seem to have been the problem.

The illegal thing didn't fly so his next excuse revolved around the revulsion on the part of the family if only 2 drugs were used.
Page would have died quickly, but his body could have continued to twitch for a half-hour or more, the governor said."There would have been a lot of revulsion on the part of the family - and they don't deserve that - and on the part of the observers and on the part of the individuals we expect to carry out the penalty who had not been trained for a two-drug execution," Rounds said. "We would never have executed an individual in the future."

But that excuse doesn't fly either.
Dr. Jonathan Groner, associate professor at the Ohio State University College of Medicine, said an execution can produce a sight that witnesses find appalling but he questioned the point Rounds was trying to make.The two drugs used under South Dakota's law would be a barbiturate that induces a coma and a muscle relaxant that paralyzes the body, each of which is sufficient to kill, he said.

"Thus, there would be no twitching," Groner said.

Okay Mike, what's your latest excuse?

Why don't you just come out and tell the truth. You couldn't make a tough decision and waited until the last minute hoping the Page would let you off the hook, and when he didn't, you put the decision into the hands of the legislature instead.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Anonymous comments are allowed as long a you pick a pseudonym and stick with it. Posting under multiple names is not permitted and will result in all comments being deleted.

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.